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Table 6 Comparison of postreperfusion and postoperative outcomes in patients with and without postreperfusion hyperkalemia

From: Elevated effluent potassium concentrations predict the development of postreperfusion hyperkalemia in deceased liver transplantation: a retrospective cohort study

  PRHK (n = 54) no PRHK (n = 32) P
sK+1 (mmol/L) 6.36 ± 0.57 4.77 ± 0.39  < 0.001
sK+5 (mmol/L) 4.20 ± 0.96 3.36 ± 0.46  < 0.001
Maximum percentage increase in sK+ after reperfusion (%) 51.61 ± 23.62 20.27 ± 13.88  < 0.001
Significant arrhythmias (n) 36 (66.7%) 6 (18.8%)  < 0.001
Cardiac arrest (n) 6 (11.1%) 1 (3.1%) 0.250
Severe PRS (n) 43 (79.6%) 18 (56.3%) 0.021
Ventilation time (hours) 3.8 (2.7–6.6) 4.0 (2.1–5.5) 0.834
Length of ICU stay (days) 3.0 (2.5–4.0) 3.4 (2.7–4.2) 0.444
Hospitalization time (days) 18.5 (15.0–27.0) 21.0 (17.0–25.8) 0.178
EAD (n) 32 (59.3%) 5 (15.6%)  < 0.001
AKI (n)a 22 (43.1%) 18 (62.1%) 0.104
Re-operation (n) 4 (7.4%) 4 (12.5%) 0.432
In-hospital mortality (n) 2 (3.7%) 2 (6.3%) 0.626
  1. Data are presented as mean and standard deviation (SD), median (interquartile range), or n (%). AKI acute kidney injury, EAD early allograft dysfunction, ICU intensive care unit, PRHK postreperfusion hyperkalemia, PRS postreperfusion syndrome, sK+ serum potassium concentration, sK+1 serum potassium concentration at one minute following reperfusion, sK+5 serum potassium concentration at five minutes following reperfusion. aPatients with preoperative dialysis or serum creatinine ≥ 133 μmol/L were excluded